A Nice Cool Down Ahead

Good Tuesday, folks. It’s another warm early September day in the bluegrass state, but two cold fronts are set to bring some much cooler air in here. As we are turning cooler, the southeastern seaboard continues to brace for powerful Hurricane Dorian.

I will get to Dorian in just a bit, but let’s start with the changes showing up across our part of the world. Today is a warm and fairly windy day as we watch a cold front dropping toward us from the northwest. That will have a lot of severe weather to our north, but the severe threat looks to largely skip our region.

This boundary arrives Wednesday with a shower or thunderstorm along and ahead of it. As the front passes, much cooler and drier air presses in here for Thursday and Friday. Thursday looks like a phenomenal day with highs likely staying way down in the 70s…

Lows by Friday morning continue to look very cool and could make a run into the upper 40s for some…

Hurricane Dorian continues to be a monster of a storm as it crawls northward just off the Florida Coast…

This storm will slowly work toward the Carolinas over the next few days then accelerate northeast, potentially grazing the northeast. Here is the update information from the National Hurricane Center…

cone graphic

Here are the latest Hurricane Model forecasts…

The GFS Ensembles…

As we approach the climatological peak of the hurricane season, Dorian isn’t the only system of interest…

Several other systems may develop over the next few days, but that doesn’t mean they will impact the United States. Can they influence the overall pattern in some way? Of course they can. We will just have to wait and see.

As of now, there’s still a decent shot of cool coming later in the weekend…

Have a great day and take care.


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23 Responses to A Nice Cool Down Ahead

  1. Marsha says:

    Chris what happen to looking down the road your blog has change so much I miss the old blog please bring it back I can remember when you be dropping hints for the winter ahead nothing I sure miss the way the blog use to be

    • Schroeder says:

      I remember 60 some years ago that the first day of school was the day after Labor Day. Everyone was wearing a jacket or sweater to school back then. I really miss the changing seasons with the racking of the falling leaves and the smell of smoke in the air. I kind of wonder if we will ever have seasonal changes again.

      • Schroeder says:

        Today, I’m kind of concerned of windy conditions in my county and area counties around me with vast forest for the possibility of fires starting in the forest and the very dry fields surrounding my property. If this isn’t a drought I don’t know what a weather person would call it.

      • Bryan says:

        Oh good grief, early September has always been warm. Next you’ll be reminiscing about snow in September.

        • Mike S says:

          For the most part, early September can be quite warm. I recall in 2011, the high temperature reached at least 100 degrees for the first 3 days of the month in Louisville. But, from the 5th through the 9th, temperatures never got above 69 and lows were deep in the 50’s. So, then, always? Exactly 45 years ago today, on a Tuesday, the day after Labor Day on the 3rd of September, the temperature only reached 58 degrees for a high temperature here in Louisville. In fact, there were 4 other days that month when the temperature did not get above 62.

    • Schroeder says:

      Cool down ahead ?

    • Winterlover says:

      Marsha I have been thinking the same thing he usually gives us a hint in what he thinks the up coming winter outlook in segments untell his official outlook.

  2. Matt says:

    There’s not much to look ahead to, were entering the quietest time of year, just enjoy the dry sunny weather for the next three months..

  3. Which Way Is the Wind Blowing says:

    A dry heat wave is forecast to follow this dry cool down.
    It looks like I am going to have to turn on my water sprinkler,

  4. Schroeder says:

    In the landscape/nursery business we would call that kind of weather a Plant Killer.

  5. Schroeder says:

    The earliest snowstorm that I can remember was on October 30th, 1993 recorded at Dress Regional Airport in Evansville, Indiana at 4.6 inches of snow. I was still in the nursery business and the snow on my Chrysanthemums which were in full bloom was beautiful !

  6. Schroeder says:

    I have seen a lot of Snowstorms in my lifetime and the last one was on 23rd of December 2004 in Evansville, Indiana. It was recorded at 22 inches at Dress Regional Airport. I have been living in central Kentucky for eleven years now and have yet to see an impressive snowstorm here. In 2009 however we had the worse Ice Storm that took out our electric power for at lease 15 days and cost me 10 thousand dollars to clean up the mess now that’s an impressive storm. I’m afraid that Ice Storms are more common here in central Kentucky than Snowstorms. I wish now that I moved further north, but it’s too late in life for me.

  7. Schroeder says:

    I have seen a lot of Snowstorms in my lifetime and the last one was on 23rd of December 2004 in Evansville, Indiana. It was recorded at 22 inches at Dress Regional Airport. I have been living in central Kentucky for eleven years now and have yet to see an impressive snowstorm here. In 2009 however we had the worse Ice Storm that took out our electric power for at lease 15 days and cost me 10 thousand dollars to clean up the mess now that’s an impressive storm. I’m afraid that Ice Storms are more common here in central Kentucky than Snowstorms. I wish now that I moved further north, but it’s too late in life for me.

  8. Schroeder says:

    Gosh you people are so young and it’s so sad that most of you hadn’t seen a year with snow that lasted through the Winter. I’am afraid the one in 2004 was my last.

  9. Schroeder says:

    Sunday, I made an observational forecast that Hurricane Dorian would make landfall near West Palm Beach, Florida. I paid no attention to any weather models and only studied the satellite images of the storms eye. I was WRONG as the storm has moved north instead of west. I don’t care where it goes now I just hope it goes out to sea away from any land.

    • Prelude says:

      Smh I’m sure glad you’re not a real life meteorologist that would be disastrous for many lol. Study the satellite images of Dorians eye wall will determine which way the steering path will be. That’s not even a uneducated good guess.

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