High Winds and Storms On The Weather Menu

Good Tuesday, everyone. The first in a series of storm systems is set to impact our weather as we kick off this long Thanksgiving holiday period. Everything from high winds, strong storms, mild temps, cold temps and some snow will be possible through Sunday.

Here’s your breakdown of the current system moving in here:

  • Gusty winds are going to be a problem. Winds may reach 50mph or greater at times tonight and early Wednesday. Batten down the hatches, Captain!
  • Showers and thunderstorms increase from west to east today through early Wednesday. A few strong storms are even possible across western Kentucky.
  • The rain ends from west to east very quickly early Wednesday as the sun makes an appearance. Temps go from the 60s in the morning to the 40s in the afternoon.

The NAM continues to show our high wind potential…

The Storm Prediction Center has far western Kentucky in the low-end risk area for severe storms…

Here are your radars to help you track the early day action from the west…

Thanksgiving itself looks to feature a seasonal chill with temps in the 40s and a mostly cloudy sky. Some late showers will try to show up and continue into Black Friday, but this isn’t even close to washout stuff.

The weekend storm continues to be a potent one and will give us the potential for strong storms on Saturday with some snow showing up late Sunday into Monday.

The Canadian Model continues to be the most consistent…

The ICON is almost spot on…

The GFS and EURO keep showing differences from run to run, but aren’t too far from the above models.

The Canadian also keeps seeing the system that tries to follow all that up later next week…

I will hook you up with updates later today, so check back. Until then, make it a good one and take care.


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10 Responses to High Winds and Storms On The Weather Menu

  1. Terry says:

    I myself would like to see a 1990s winter again, especially for my two kids. Yes, I know you old folks talk about how much worse winter was before the 90s, but that is literally the only decade in my lifetime were we actually had consistently in winter. Yes, growing up in the 90s, I remember the warm spells in winter; however, it seemed to warm up briefly then back to cold it went. Now, it is just the opposite: We cool down briefly then right back to warm we go. Hopefully we get a little snow next week as it looks, unfortunately mild again later on next week. Blah!

    • Terry says:

      Consistency, not consistently.

    • Jimbo says:

      The mid 90’s were great Winters in my area of WV. I lived in Charleston then and we got 106 inches of snow in 95/96. I doubt that record will ever be broken. Record cold in 94 and 96. those Winters rivaled the ones of the late 70’s, which I was also around for. With the exception of the brief cold snap to begin the month, the pattern looks a lot like the last several years. Storms moving towards the Lakes putting us always on the warm side before the dreaded backside flurries arrive.

  2. Bus Haynes says:

    Computer models are like going to the movies. They are very entertaining but that’s about it. They build you up for a fall when it comes to forecasting long range forecasts.

  3. Schroeder says:

    One of these days we will get one of those block buster snowstorms here in Kentucky. Keep hoping snow lovers !

  4. Prelude says:

    The much advertised artic air for next week has disappeared?

  5. Virgil E says:

    Maybe Chris’s Bold Prediction for a Severe Storms event will be realized before the end of 2019

  6. Mike S says:

    A great write-up from NWS Jackson about The Great Appalachian Storm of 1950….
    https://www.weather.gov/jkl/appalachianstorm1950

  7. Jimbo says:

    Interesting article. We still see arctic fronts with frigid temperatures. Difference is anymore they only bring flurries and the cold is brief. Potent northwest flow/lake effect snows have been absent for years around here.

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