Irma Brings Gusty Rains To Kentucky

Good Tuesday, everyone. Historic Hurricane Irma continues to weaken into a tropical depression, but it’s still packing a rainy punch. Showers continue to increase across the bluegrass state, with gusty showers and storms hanging around for a few more days.

Today’s heaviest rainfall comes early on, with some local 1″ amounts possible by evening. Winds will also be gusty and could reach 30mph at times this morning, especially in the south.

By the afternoon, we will likely see some breaks in the clouds, but a few showers and storms will continue. This is NOT going to be an all day rain event.

Track away…


The actual remnant low from Irma will likely work east into Kentucky late Wednesday into Wednesday night. You can actually pick this up very well by looking just a littler upstairs…

That will spawn some pretty good rainers during this time and these will be slow-movers. Temps may struggle to get much past the 60 degree mark, making for a very nasty day.

Scattered showers and storms will then continue into Thursday, with some locally heavy downpours.

Our weekend turns warmer as temps finally push back toward the 80 degree mark. This pattern is trying to skew a little warmer over the next week and change.

We are still going to have to keep a close eye on Jose out in the Atlantic. This will do a loop and could make a run at the east coast this weekend or early next week. The current trend on the models is to keep turn this back out to sea…

Still plenty of time to watch Jose and see what happens.

Have a great Tuesday and take care.


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18 Responses to Irma Brings Gusty Rains To Kentucky

  1. Schroeder., says:

    With this cool, wet September about to come to and end, and the return back to our usual late summer pattern, I was wondering if we will have colorful foliage this fall ? Here’s the seven day forecast: http://www.weatherstreet.com/states/kentucky-max-temperature-forecast.htm

  2. Schroeder., says:

    Here’s the 90 day outlook, does not look to be very fall like. It seems like this is a more predominate fall weather pattern the past several years. http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=1

  3. Schroeder., says:

    This is my last post on hurricane Irma, I called my sister who lives in Venice, Florida and she gave me the good news, that they had no damage to their home or property. The only bad news is they do not have power, or water from their well, but it will be restored by the weekend hopefully. I, was just wondering if we had develop a weak El nino in August, the Atlantic would not have been so active, and we would have a different weather situation here in the Ohio River valley ?

    • BubbaG says:

      Irma was nowhere near as bad as could have been, but would not be able to tell that from TWC and the national mets. They truly have no shame. Still funny though how they were saying a landfall hit in Florida was Worst Case Scenario, then when it hit, they then move the goal post and said that actually weakened it. With the goal posts now moved, Worst Case Scenario was more west now. Winning!

      My guess is when CB goes to a met conference or other event when he is with these folks, he has to take a shower afterwards.

      • LD says:

        “Severity” is about property damage and loss, human life is just a headline ‘leader’ in coverage.
        You do watch *American* media and weather coverage, right?

        Trying to wrap my head around the idea that Irma wasn’t devastating enough to the people, land, and property of the U.S. because it didn’t match whatever media or weather statements. I am certain there’s a few million people that would love to have this conversation with you about that idea and their personal losses. You should seek them out as the rest of us won’t be able to share that perspective with you directly.

        Darth Barbrady
        https://i.imgflip.com/1f0lcn.jpg

        Stay safe out there kids! 🙂

  4. Tom says:

    Hurricanes Harvey and Irma caused between $150 billion and $200 billion in damage to Texas and Florida, comparable to the costs from Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005, a according to a preliminary estimate from Moody’s Analytics on Monday.

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